Supreme Court Nominee, Brett Kavanaugh in his own words

“I am an independent, impartial judge” Letter originally published Oct 5th in the Wall Street Journal By Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh I was deeply honored to stand at the White House July 9 with my wife, Ashley, and my daughters, Margaret and Liza, to accept President Trump’s nomination to succeed my former boss and…

Is Brett Kavanaugh the next Supreme Court Justice?

As the Judiciary Committee meets this week to discuss the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to become the Associate General of the United States Supreme Court.  Part of the process is the swearing in of the Nominee prior to his discussions with the Committee. During these discussions, Senators are given time for an opening statement and opportunity…

Supreme court Nominee takes it to the Hill.

Is Senator Rand Paul playing Politics or does he actually have concern for privacy issues? Read more in today’s Louisville Courier-Journal By Thomas Novelly U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, who has publicly expressed concern with Brett Kavanaugh, will meet Tuesday with the Supreme Court nominee. Doug Stafford, chief strategist for Paul’s campaign, told the Courier-Journal on Monday…

Supreme Court Nominee and the 21 papers.

What do 21 letters written to newspaper editors have to do with a Supreme Court Nominee? The mystery came in the form of a letter.  Not just one, many letters at least 21.  These letters were each signed by different individuals but were otherwise identical.  The letters were sent to at least 21 newspapers. While Brett…

Supreme Court Nominee visits Capitol Hill.

President Trump nominated Brett Kavanaugh on Prime Time TV with little, if any word as to who the nominee would be until the President announced it to the world. Kavanaugh’s first day on the Hill, meeting with Senators but not before an introduction by Vice President Pence saying “We’re honored to be able to bring…

Who will be President Trump’s Scotuspick?

Rarely are new Supreme Court justices nominated. The lifetime appointment means a Supreme Court Justice can remain on the bench long after his initial nomination.  In fact, most President’s will not live past the tenure of their appointee to the Supreme Court.  The average tenure for a current Supreme Court Justice is around 20 years…

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